Understanding Permitted Development & Planning Applications

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Ownership Certificate & Notice (required for all applications)
  • Agricultural Holdings Certificate (required for all applications)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Archaeological Assessment (required for sites falling within Archaeological Priority Areas)
  • Daylight/Sunlight Assessment
  • Heritage Statement (required for all applications for new buildings – should be considered for applications re telecommunications and for large advertisement hoardings)
  • Photographs/Photomontage (required for all Major applications of 10 + residential units & 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Tree Survey/Report/Tree Protection Plan (required when trees are present on the site or affected on an adjacent site)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Ownership Certificate & Notice (required for all applications)
  • Agricultural Holdings Certificate (required for all applications)
  • Design & Access Statement (incorporating a Lifetime Homes Statement, Wheelchair Accessibility Statement and a Safety and Security Assessment) (required for major developments, or where any part of the development is in a ‘designated area’
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Affordable House Statement (required for developments of 10 or more units)
  • Air Quality Assessment
  • Amenity, Playspace, Open Space Assessment (required for all major residential applications 10 units or more)
  • Archaeological Assessment (Usually for sites falling within Archaeological Priority Areas) (required for sites falling within Archaeological Priority Areas)
  • Aviation Impact Assessment (required for tall buildings)
  • Construction Logistics Plan
  • Community Facilities Statement
  • Community Involvement Statement
  • Contaminated Land Assessment
  • Daylight/Sunlight Assessment
  • Ecological Assessment
  • Economic/Employment Statement (required for all major applications 10+ residential units and 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Energy Statement (required for Schedule 1 and 2 projects where there would be significant environmental effects)
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Statement (required for all applications of new buildings in areas at high risk of flooding)
  • Flood Risk Assessment (required for all applications that require a sewerage connection)
  • Foul Sewage and Utilities Assessment (required for Listed Building Consents & Conservesation Area Consents applications)
  • Heritage Statement (required for all applications for new buildings – should be considered for applications re telecommunications and for large advertisement hoardings)
  • Landscape Assessment
  • Lighting Assessment
  • Microclimate Wind Assessment & TV/Radio Reception
  • Noise and Vibration Impact Assessment (required for major developments, those that involve demolition and those that affect a Conservation Area or Listed Building)
  • Photographs/Photomontage (required for all Major applications of 10 + residential units & 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Planning Obligations (Draft Heads of Terms) (required for all major developments, or where any part of the development is in a ‘designated area’ & where the development would be one or more dwelling-houses or a building(s) of 100 square metres or more)
  • Planning Statement (required for all applications for Advertisement Consent)
  • Socio Economic Assessment
  • Waste Plan
  • Sustainability Appraisal
  • Telecommunications Supplementary Information (required for all telecommunications applications)
  • Topography
  • Town Centre Uses Assessment (required for all retail, commercial, culture and leisure developments or extensions to existing such developments located in edge of centre/out of centre locations)
  • Transport Assessment
  • Travel Plan (required for applications with significant transport implications)
  • Tree Survey/Report/Tree Protection Plan (required when trees are present on the site or affected on an adjacent site)
  • Ventilation/Extraction Statement (required for all applications for Use Classes A3, A4 and A5)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Ownership Certificate & Notice (required for all applications)
  • Agricultural Holdings Certificate (required for all applications)
  • Design & Access Statement (incorporating a Lifetime Homes Statement, Wheelchair Accessibility Statement and a Safety and Security Assessment) (required for major developments, or where any part of the development is in a ‘designated area’)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Affordable House Statement (required for developments of 10 or more units)
  • Air Quality Assessment
  • Amenity, Playspace, Open Space Assessment (required for all major residential applications 10 units or more)
  • Archaeological Assessment (Usually for sites falling within Archaeological Priority Areas)
  • Construction Logistics Plan
  • Community Facilities Statement
  • Community Involvement Statement
  • Contaminated Land Assessment
  • Daylight/Sunlight Assessment
  • Ecological Assessment
  • Economic/Employment Statement (required for all major applications 10+ residential units and 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Energy Statement (required for Schedule 1 and 2 projects where there would be significant environmental effects)
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Statement (required for all applications of new buildings in areas at high risk of flooding)
  • Flood Risk Assessment (required for all applications that require a sewerage connection)
  • Foul Sewage and Utilities Assessment (required for Listed Building Consents & Conservesation Area Consents applications)
  • Heritage Statement (required for all applications for new buildings – should be considered for applications re telecommunications and for large advertisement hoardings)
  • Landscape Assessment
  • Lighting Assessment
  • Microclimate Wind Assessment & TV/Radio Reception
  • Noise and Vibration Impact Assessment
  • Photographs/Photomontage
  • Planning Obligations (Draft Heads of Terms)
  • Planning Statement
  • Socio Economic Assessment
  • Waste Plan
  • Sustainability Appraisal
  • Telecommunications Supplementary Information
  • Topography
  • Town Centre Uses Assessment
  • Transport Assessment
  • Travel Plan
  • Tree Survey/Report/Tree Protection Plan (required when trees are present on the site or affected on an adjacent site)
  • Ventilation/Extraction Statement

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications for Use Classes A3, A4 and A5)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Ownership Certificate & Notice (required for all applications)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Heritage Statement (required for all applications for new buildings – should be considered for applications re telecommunications and for large advertisement hoardings)
  • Photographs/Photomontage (required for all Major applications of 10 + residential units & 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Planning Statement (required for all applications for Advertisement Consent)
  • Structural Assessment of Building (required for all major developments of 10+ residential units and 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Tree Survey/Report/Tree Protection Plan (required when trees are present on the site or affected on an adjacent site)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Ownership Certificate & Notice (required for all applications)
  • Design & Access Statement (incorporating a Lifetime Homes Statement, Wheelchair Accessibility Statement and a Safety and Security Assessment) (required for major developments, or where any part of the development is in a ‘designated area’)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Heritage Statement (required for all applications for new buildings – should be considered for applications re telecommunications and for large advertisement hoardings)
  • Landscape Assessment
  • Photographs/Photomontage (required for all Major applications of 10 + residential units & 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Planning Statement (required for all applications for Advertisement Consent)
  • Tree Survey/Report/Tree Protection Plan (required when trees are present on the site or affected on an adjacent site)
  • Ventilation/Extraction Statement
    • (required for all applications for Use Classes A3, A4 and A5)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Heritage Statement (required for all applications for new buildings – should be considered for applications re telecommunications and for large advertisement hoardings)
  • Photographs/Photomontage (required for all Major applications of 10 + residential units & 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Planning Statement (required for all applications for Advertisement Consent)
  • Safety Appraisal for Pedestrian & Vehicular Traffic (required for all applications for Lawful Development Certificates for Part 1 of the GPDO – Development within the Curtilage of a Dwelling house)
  • Tree Survey/Report/Tree Protection Plan (required when trees are present on the site or affected on an adjacent site)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Photographs/Photomontage (required for all Major applications of 10 + residential units & 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Planning Statement (required for all applications for Advertisement Consent)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Photographs/Photomontage (required for all Major applications of 10 + residential units & 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Planning Statement (required for all applications for Advertisement Consent)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Heritage Statement (required for all applications for new buildings – should be considered for applications re telecommunications and for large advertisement hoardings)
  • Landscape Assessment
  • Photographs/Photomontage (required for all Major applications of 10 + residential units & 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Planning Statement (required for all applications for Advertisement Consent)
  • Telecommunications Supplementary Information (required for all telecommunications applications)
  • Tree Survey/Report/Tree Protection Plan (required when trees are present on the site or affected on an adjacent site)
  • Ventilation/Extraction Statement (required for all applications for Use Classes A3, A4 and A5)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Heritage Statement (required for all applications for new buildings – should be considered for applications re telecommunications and for large advertisement hoardings)
  • Photographs/Photomontage (required for all Major applications of 10 + residential units & 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Planning Statement (required for all applications for Advertisement Consent)
  • Tree Survey/Report/Tree Protection Plan (required when trees are present on the site or affected on an adjacent site)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Design & Access Statement (incorporating a Lifetime Homes Statement, Wheelchair Accessibility Statement and a Safety and Security Assessment) (required for major developments, or where any part of the development is in a ‘designated area’)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Affordable House Statement (required for developments of 10 or more units)
  • Air Quality Assessment
  • Amenity, Playspace, Open Space Assessment (required for all major residential applications 10 units or more)
  • Archaeological Assessment (Usually for sites falling within Archaeological Priority Areas) (required for sites falling within Archaeological Priority Areas)
  • Contaminated Land Assessment
  • Daylight/Sunlight Assessment
  • Economic/Employment Statement (required for all major applications 10+ residential units and 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Energy Statement (required for Schedule 1 and 2 projects where there would be significant environmental effects)
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Statement (required for all applications of new buildings in areas at high risk of flooding)
  • Flood Risk Assessment (required for all applications that require a sewerage connection)
  • Foul Sewage and Utilities Assessment (required for Listed Building Consents & Conservesation Area Consents applications)
  • Heritage Statement (required for all applications for new buildings – should be considered for applications re telecommunications and for large advertisement hoardings)
  • Landscape Assessment
  • Lighting Assessment
  • Sustainability Appraisal
  • Telecommunications Supplementary Information (required for all telecommunications applications)
  • Topography
  • Town Centre Uses Assessment (required for all retail, commercial, culture and leisure developments or extensions to existing such developments located in edge of centre/out of centre locations)
  • Transport Assessment
  • Travel Plan (required for applications with significant transport implications)
  • Tree Survey/Report/Tree Protection Plan (required when trees are present on the site or affected on an adjacent site)
  • Ventilation/Extraction Statement (required for all applications for Use Classes A3, A4 and A5)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Ownership Certificate & Notice (required for all applications)
  • Agricultural Holdings Certificate (required for all applications)
  • Design & Access Statement (incorporating a Lifetime Homes Statement, Wheelchair Accessibility Statement and a Safety and Security Assessment) (required for major developments, or where any part of the development is in a ‘designated area’)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Affordable House Statement (required for developments of 10 or more units)
  • Air Quality Assessment
  • Amenity, Playspace, Open Space Assessment (required for all major residential applications 10 units or more)
  • Archaeological Assessment (Usually for sites falling within Archaeological Priority Areas) (required for sites falling within Archaeological Priority Areas)
  • Contaminated Land Assessment
  • Daylight/Sunlight Assessment
  • Economic/Employment Statement (required for all major applications 10+ residential units and 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Energy Statement (required for Schedule 1 and 2 projects where there would be significant environmental effects)
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Statement (required for all applications of new buildings in areas at high risk of flooding)
  • Flood Risk Assessment (required for all applications that require a sewerage connection)
  • Foul Sewage and Utilities Assessment (required for Listed Building Consents & Conservesation Area Consents applications)
  • Heritage Statement (required for all applications for new buildings – should be considered for applications re telecommunications and for large advertisement hoardings)
  • Landscape Assessment
  • Lighting Assessment
  • Noise and Vibration Impact Assessment (required for major developments, those that involve demolition and those that affect a Conservation Area or Listed Building)
  • Photographs/Photomontage (required for all Major applications of 10 + residential units & 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Planning Obligations (Draft Heads of Terms) (required for all major developments, or where any part of the development is in a ‘designated area’ & where the development would be one or more dwelling-houses or a building(s) of 100 square metres or more)
  • Planning Statement (required for all applications for Advertisement Consent)
  • Sustainability Appraisal
  • Telecommunications Supplementary Information (required for all telecommunications applications)
  • Town Centre Uses Assessment (required for all retail, commercial, culture and leisure developments or extensions to existing such developments located in edge of centre/out of centre locations)
  • Transport Assessment
  • Travel Plan (required for applications with significant transport implications)
  • Tree Survey/Report/Tree Protection Plan (required when trees are present on the site or affected on an adjacent site)
  • Ventilation/Extraction Statement

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Planning Statement (required for all applications for Advertisement Consent)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)

Councils also have local requirements, these could included:

  • Photographs/Photomontage (required for all Major applications of 10 + residential units & 1000 sqm non-residential floorspace)
  • Tree Survey/Report/Tree Protection Plan (required when trees are present on the site or affected on an adjacent site)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)

The Statutory National Planning Application Requirements List:

  • Completed Forms (required for all applications)
  • Site Location Plan (required for all applications)
  • Other Plans/Information (required for all applications)
  • Appropriate Fee (required for all applications)
Do I need a party wall agreement?
When do you need a party wall notice or party wall agreement (technically called a party wall award)? Our guide gives you all the answers you need to obtain the correct permissions to carry out your building works.
When do I need a party wall agreement?
A party wall is the shared wall, usually between a terrace or semi-detached house, and divides the homes of two separate owners
It also includes garden walls built over a boundary and excavations close to a neighbour’s property (within three or six meters, depending on the depth of the new foundations).
In the home, Party Wall Agreements are most commonly needed for building works that involve loft conversions, the insertion of damp proof courses and the digging of new foundations (as would be required in building an extension)
Obtaining permission for party wall building works
Before party wall building works can start, the homeowner (Building Owner) needs a written Party Wall Agreement from all affected neighbours (Adjoining Owners).

Party Wall Agreements and Notices

The majority of building works carried out involve a Party Wall Notice, below is the most common form work where a Party Wall Notice is required.
• Loft Conversions
• Rear Extensions
• Side Extensions
• Internal alterations affecting the party wall.
The Party Wall Act 1996 has been put in place for a number of reasons involving construction works and alterations. The Party Wall Act is there to protect yourself and your neighbour(s).
As a general rule of thumb we advise our clients that a party wall notice is to be served to your neighbours prior to the building works begin (min. 8 weeks). This is to allow for your neighbour to respond and or address any queries they may have. Allowing time before the works begin to organise the party wall notice, will in most cases prevent any delays in the works or any unforeseen circumstances.
A party wall is a wall shared between adjacent properties and owned by two owners, for example the wall between a semi detached or terraced house. When works being carried out to this wall other than maintenance, a party wall notice will need to be served. An example of when a party wall notice has to be served is with a loft conversion, the new steel beams supporting the ridge  and floor will be inserted into the party wall, a party wall notice will need to be served. Also with rear or side extensions if your neighbour is within 3m of your extension and you are digging foundations that will be below their foundations a party wall notice will need to be served. If you are building an extension and the excavation for foundations are within 6m of your neighbour and the structure within 6m is within a 45 degree plane of your excavation a part wall notice needs to be served. Once a notice has been served your neighbour(s) then has the right to dissent and appoint their own surveyor.
It is always advisable that you serve a party wall notice to your neighbour(s) as the completion of the works may be delayed and can even be stopped until a notice has been put in place. The Party Wall Act 1996 is an effective tool to protect yourself as well as your neighbour and to avoid any disputes regarding the works to be carried out. If you have been served a notice by your neighbour, it is advisable to go through the notice carefully to obtain a full understanding of the works and see all drawings associated with the works. If you have any queries or wish to dispute the notice you can appoint a surveyor at your neighbours expense to represent you in the matter.

The party wall process?

Once you have served notice, your neighbours, known as “the adjoining owners”, have 14 days to respond. Work can go ahead immediately if they agree in writing. If they dissent or fail to reply the matter goes into dispute, and this is when it can become expensive.   You should give your adjoining owners at least 10 days to decide whether one surveyor can act for both of you or whether two surveyors should be involved in drawing up a party wall award, which lays out the rules your builder must adhere to while carrying out the party wall works. Your neighbour’s property will also be surveyed both before and after the works are carried out to see if any damage has occurred, which you’ll need to repair.

What are planning decisions based on
• Local Planning Authority development policy and material considerations
• Many factors relate to land development, although private matters do not
• See your local neighbourhood plans for relevant development policies
Planning Permission & The Law
It is lawful for planning applications to be decided according to development policy, unless there are contra-indications with material considerations. Application decisions are therefore policy-led, as opposed to influence-led. Near neighbours and the public will be consulted in most cases, but the result of the application will not be decided via popularity or grievance. Planning policies prevent results being decided by arbitrary, perverse or improper factors.
What Is A Neighbourhood Plan?
This is the plan intended to give best policy to the local community via consulting the people who use the area, from its residents to businesses, stakeholders and local MPs.
These plans are the first policy documents a Local Planning Authority will consult. They are made up of written policies, explanations and proposal maps covering issues such as:
• Area-specific issues
• Community
• Countryside
• Design
• Development Control Criteria
• Employment
• General Strategy
• Green Belt
• Heritage
• Housing
• Sustainability
• Tourism & Leisure
• Transport
Councils sometimes add to local plan use via Supplementary Planning Documents or Guidance (SPD or SPGs) which give further guidance about affordable housing, financial contributions, design and other area-specific considerations. Local plan policy needs to be in line with the government’s national planning policy framework (NPPF).
Material Considerations
Local Authority Planning Departments base their decisions on material considerations. This can be complex since what defines a material consideration is not specified in law. Moreover, not every material consideration applies to each project. The most common material considerations which might impact applications are:
Appearance, Materials & Design
Design covers things like dimensions, shape, proportions, materials, style and finish of a building. Acceptable design is subjective and variable. With respect to material considerations, the design should fit its surroundings by following, reflecting or tastefully contrasting the design of adjoining buildings.
Archeology
If an area contains an archaeological site, it may be protected. It may not result in a refusal, but the site will normally require excavation before work starts. The developer should also take extra care with the site.
Density Of The Building & Layout
The proposed scale and design of a new build should match the existing site with respect to the nearby buildings, retaining the character of the area.
The amount of space round a build is also important, as well as where it sits within the plot. Following the pattern of the area in this respect also defines the character of an area.
Development Benefits
Sometimes the benefits of a proposal outweigh local or policy objections. This clearly is a positive material consideration.
Environment
The planning authority will consider the impact of new proposals on trees and plant life, and wildlife, especially with any protected species (such as otters.)
Green Belt
In green belts, most new builds will be viewed as inappropriate, so material considerations will be very restrictive. However, there is a limited set of acceptable development criteria in the NPPF (National Planning Policy Framework).
• Agricultural and forestry buildings
• Outdoor sports facilities and, providing that open spaces and green belt purposes remain unaffected, outdoor recreation and cemeteries.
• Extensions and alterations to existing buildings, provided they do not result in disproportionate additions to the scale of the original property.
• You can replace existing buildings, provided the new building does not mean a change of use, and is not larger than the previous building
• Limited housing for the local community and limited infilling of properties in villages so long as they follow the policies in the Local Plan
• Limited infilling or partial or complex redevelopment of brownfield sites which are either redundant or in continuing use (not including temporary buildings), so long as openness and green belt purposes are unaffected.
Parking & Access
The noise of cars in parking places and access drives can constitute a material consideration, especially if the development is adjacent to existing residential properties with gardens. Highway safety will be considered, adequate physical access parking provision and turning space. Councils vary re parking requirements, for example the amount of off-street parking required is reduced if there are good public transport links, adequate road parking or public car parks.
Permitted Development
What will also be considered is the level of permitted development rights.
Physical Factors
What this means is which buildings or obstacles are currently present. It is also the underlying ground conditions, and mapping & charting of the site as per existing topography. These can influence or constrain the preferred position of a proposal within a site. In addition, access to local services and amenities are common material considerations.
Planning History
This is a search of past approved permissions, refusals and appeals in the immediate area. This is a material consideration.
Precedent
Even though planning history is considered, each case has to be looked at on its individual merits. Planners should be fair and consistent when applying their policies.
Residential Amenities
New builds need to be aware of their neighbours’ right to light and privacy; generally respecting their amenities. Things like overshadowing or loss of comfort will be taken into consideration.
Risk Of Flooding
Applications for new builds in vulnerable areas are likely to be unsuccessful, unless there are no other options outside the risk zone.
Special Designations
The new build may possibly impact on areas of outstanding natural beauty, conservation areas or listed buildings. Buildings, views and open spaces contribute to an area’s character, which is quite a big material consideration. Planners try to protect listed buildings, whilst the law protects conservation areas.
Support / Opposition Level
If public opinion lends weight to a subjective judgement, such as on its design merits, then this will be a material consideration.

Understanding Building Regulations Requirements:

This part is concerned with the structural stability of buildings. Areas covered include design of foundations, walls, floors and roof components and also in limiting the extent to which parts of the building may collapse if a major catastrophe, like a gas explosion occurs.
Approved Document A – Structural Safety

This part includes requirement for providing early warning of a developing fire, satisfactory escape routes, preventing fire spread both within and to other buildings and providing good access and fire fighting facilities for the Fire Services.
Approved Document B – Fire safety

This part contains the recommendations of making sure your property remains free from damp penetration, condensation, from any contamination that may be in the ground, and watertight.
Approved Document C – Site Preparation and Resistance to Contaminates and Moisture

This part provides guidance on the prevention of toxic substances permeating into the building when inserting insulation into cavity walls.
Approved Document D – Toxic Substances

This part includes requirement aimed at reducing sound transference between dwellings, flats, from certain types of rooms and between communal areas and dwellings.
Approved Document E – Resistance to the Passage of Sound

This part provides for adequate levels of ventilation to buildings and prevention of condensation forming in roof voids.
Approved Document F – Ventilation

This part is concerned with providing sanitary conveniences and adequate washing facilities. It also includes requirements associated with unvented hot water storage installations.
Approved Document G – Hygiene

This part deals with the disposal of sewerage, waste water and storm water drainage together with details for solid waste storage (household refuse).
Approved Document H – Drainage and Waste Disposal

This part covers safety requirements when installing either solid fuel, gas or oil heating appliances.
Approved Document J – Combustion Appliance and Fuel Storage Systems

This part is concerned with staircase design, headroom, handrails, balustrading and guarding of landings, balconies and other raised areas.
Approved Document K – Protection from Falling, Collision and Impact

This part provides minimum standards of energy efficiency to all parts of the building. This section also provides design criteria for space heating and hot water storage.
Approved Document L – Conservation of Fuel and Power

This part deals with the design of buildings to enable all people to gain access, and be able to use the facilities of the building. It also includes requirements to help people with sight, hearing and mobility impairments use buildings.
Approved Document M – Access to and Use of Buildings

This area is concerned with providing safety glass in critical locations (glazing you are likely to walk into or fall against).
Approved Document N – Glazing Safety

This part applies to electrical installation work in dwellings, common parts to dwellings and associated gardens.
This section came into effect on 1 January 2006 and applies in buildings or parts of buildings comprising:
Dwelling houses and flats;
Dwelling and business premises that have a common supply – for example shops and public houses with a flat above;
Shared amenities of blocks of flats such as laundries and gymnastics.
Part P applies also to parts of the above electrical installations:
In or on land associated with the buildings – for example Part P applies to fixed lighting and
Pond pumps in gardens;
In outbuildings such as sheds, detached garages and greenhouses.
This means that new electrical installations carried out either on their own or as part of, for example a loft conversion or extension need to be certified by a qualified person. The certificate is then sent to us for our records.
If you cannot do this you will need to notify us so that we can inspect the work.
Approved Document P – Electrical Safety

Deals with unauthorised access through doors and windows.

Physical Infrastructure for High Speed Electronic Communications Networks. Deals with in-building physical infrastructure.
Approved Document for Regulation 7 – Material and Workmanship
Building Over a Shared Sewer?
Building over close to a Public Sewer.
The Water Authority is responsible for maintaining public sewers, which are sometime located within the boundaries of properties. You must get their agreement to carry out any building work over the top of or within 3 metres of a public sewer to ensure that no damage is caused to it or restrictions made to the way the Water Authorities use and maintain the sewer.
What is a public sewer?
A sewer is a pipe that serves more than one property. All drainage pipes (that connect to the water authorities) are now public sewers except where only one property is served by the existing pipe, which is known as a drain. A drain is privately owned and maintained to the property boundary by the home owner, once it crosses the property boundary this pipe becomes the Water  Authorities responsibility.
Why do I need to apply?
Public sewers can often run through private land, under houses and through gardens. Any building works within 3 metres of these sewers needs to be approved by the Local Water Authorities to ensure that the sewerage network is not compromised.
Some minor public sewers serving a number of houses, often run along the back of older properties. As these may not show up on the sewer maps it is important that the Water Authorities is contacted at an early stage if it is suspected that a public sewer could be present. This will enable them to discuss and agree any necessary steps required to avoid problems in the future.
Your Local Water Authority need to know about any building work near or over a public sewer in order to:
• Prevent the sewer collapsing. The extra weight of a new building above could cause the sewer to collapse, resulting in structural damage to the new building, interrupted drainage from other properties and wastewater flooding. In these instances the sewer will need to be repaired quickly and this may involved taking down the building.
• Ensure they have access to carry out maintenance and repairs
What are my Build Over options?
If you find that your plans could affect a public sewer, you should first consider on of the following options:
• Avoiding the sewer through modifications to your plans so that the buildings are at least 3 metres away from the sewer. This is often the easiest and cheapest option.
• Diverting the sewer. If your plans cannot be modified, your Local Water Authority will usually require the sewer to be diverted. In most cases they will have to carry out the work but at your expense.
What happens if building over will not be permitted?

The Water Authorities will not permit building over on a new detached development – a sewer diversion will be required funded by the developer.
Where feasible, manholes should be removed and piped through.
How does the Build Over Process work?
If having considered the alternatives your only option is to apply to build over a public sewer, a written application form must be made to your Local Water Authority. In some circumstances, they may allow you to build over a sewer subject to the sewer being in satisfactory condition and their written Agreement to do this before you start work.
For all classes, except class 1 domestic, they will need to carry out a Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) survey before you begin work to ascertain whether any repair work is required. Another survey is required when your building is completed to check that the sewer has not been damaged. If you have not obtained their agreement, in certain circumstances, the Water Authority have the right to discontinue your works and the buildings erected over the public sewer may need to be taken down. Contacting your Local Water Authority as early as possible in the design process is encouraged to avoid any abortive costs, delays or other problems.
What do the Water Authority Charge?
A charge is made for every build over application. The level of charge will depend on the size of the sewer to be surveyed and whether a detailed investigation is necessary. In some cases, where major “strategic” sewers are involved, a formal legal Agreement will be required.

How do I locate a public sewer?
We will liaise with your Local Water Authority in order to locate a public sewer and investigate the site for drainage on site and map both public and private sewers.

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